Podcast 192 — Banishing the stigma of part-time working

Evidence has shown that part-time workers can outperform full-time workers. So why is it that they often feel stigmatized or second-tier within their organization? And what can leaders and managers do to challenge this?

Written by Nicola Boyle
Published 28 April 2020
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Podcast 192 — Banishing the stigma of part-time working

This week on the Good Practice Podcast, Nicola Boyle and Lucy Bishop are joined by Nikki Slowey and Lisa Gallagher from Flexibility Works.

In the episode we discuss:

  • How to challenge the stigma of part-time work
  • How to effectively manage part-time staff
  • How to go part-time and job-share in senior roles
Nicola

Hello, and welcome to The Good Practice podcast from Emerald Works, a weekly show about work performance and learning. I'm Nicole Boyle. And this week, we're talking about part-time working. Here with me this week and making her debut on The Good Practice podcast is Emerald Works content director Lucy Bishop. Hi Lucy

Lucy

Hi there!

Nicola

And we're joined by two special guests. Returning to the podcast is Nikki Slowey, director and co-founder at Flexibility Works. Hi Nikki

Nikki

Hi!

Nicola

And Lisa Gallagher, also director and co-founder at Flexibility Works. Hi, Lisa

Lisa

Hi!

Nicola

So there can sometimes be a stigma associated with part-time work. Why do you think this is? What are some of the reasons for this?

Lisa

Well, I'd like to give a bit of background about who typically works part-time, first of all. Almost two thirds of those working flexibly are women. And the majority of those are working part-time. And many of those find themselves trapped in lower-pay roles, with little opportunity to progress while retaining the flexibility that they need. And this is really detrimental to women's career's prospects, and a root cause of the gender pay gap. And it's also really detrimental to employers too, because many of them are facing skills shortages, and challenges in accessing talent

And really, I think a lot of the stigma attached to this is a mindset thing of managers and people leading organizations. So, people who maybe believe that if you're working part-time, that you're maybe not so committed to your career. Or, if you've got a family you're perhaps perceived as work isn't such a priority anymore. And also just that basic mindset that work is Monday to Friday nine-to-five, and perhaps not thinking a bit more creatively about when, how, and where people work

Nicola

Yeah. That is actually something that I considered just when we started this conversation: is the fact that we are four women talking about part-time work. And that does seem to be maybe a bit of a cliche, or a bit of an elephant in the room, the fact that we are women talking about this subject. So it's interestingly, so what you said there about the two thirds of part-time work... Was it two thirds of part-time workers are women

Lisa

So two thirds of those working flexibly are women, and the majority work part-time. So when we talk about working flexibly, it could be part-time, job-share, compressed hours, small adjustments to start and finish times, and so on. And part-time is just one of those options. But the majority of those working flexibly are women. And majority of those are working part-time

Nikki

Yeah, I think that's probably because there's this idea that women are the ones that want to be the caregivers to young children. And that's sort of put on... Well, that's something that I wanted to do. That was the choice that I made, but also because there's the financial reasons. It's that my husband earns more than me. So it wouldn't make financial sense for him to be working part-time, and me to be working full-time. So there were two reasons why I made the decision to work part-time

Lucy

And there's definitely more men wanting to work flexibly, maybe part-time or compressing their hours. But what we're hearing is that a lot of men find it quite difficult still to ask in their workplace to work flexibly. That they are scared that they'll be perceived as not as committed to their career, or it'll have a detrimental impact on their career. Their colleagues will see them as less committed. So, there's still some kind of stigma attached to men asking and wanting to work flexibly. Although for a lot of men they want to. I mean a story that I heard recently that maybe sound familiar to some of you is, the school calls, the guy gets the call at work, and his colleagues says to him, ""Where's your wife? Where's your missus? Why is she not going and dealing with this school emergency?"

So you can see why for a lot of men, it is actually quite difficult to open up those conversations about working flexibly, when those kinds of really outdated attitudes are still so prevalent within the workplace

Nicola

So is it potentially a bigger stigma for men, that's what we're saying, to work part time

Lisa

I think it's difficult to ask for something if you don't necessarily see it all around you. So in companies where you see this working well, is where you've got senior leaders who are men, for example, who are working flex by either part-time or compressed hours, or who might just say, ""I've got to leave early today to pick up my kids,"" or ""I'm going to the gym at lunchtime or whatever."" So being quite loud and bold, I guess, in a way about the way in which they work, which is effective for them, which makes them in turn more productive for their company. But if you don't have those role models, it's difficult to ask, and almost be that champion within your company to talk about working flexibly or part-time

Nicola

So what can organizations and leaders and managers within these organizations do to challenge the stigma?

Nikki

Well, the role models, I think is really important. You can't be what you can't see. So I think for both men and women at all levels on the organization to be working part-time, when you can see that, it almost gives a signal to other workers that, ""This is okay, this is acceptable. I can work in a part-time basis, and it wouldn't impact my career."" I think managers just need to be really open, and have really good open conversations with employees, and be really mindful of what they're seeing and how they're approaching these conversations

And also, when someone is working part time, make sure that they are still included within the team, that they're still getting the same opportunities to good projects, to good work, they're getting the same access to training, that meetings are not being arranged on the days that they don't work. So it's all of those sorts of things. I think if managers are mindful all are going to get in place, it will encourage others to then ask to work part-time within the organization

They're really just practical common sense things from a manager's point of view, to make sure that the part-time workers are equally included

Lisa

And I would seek to add to that as well. Communication is key at all levels, and in all sorts of different ways. So first of all, the understanding by the chief exec of what the benefits of flexible working are, and talk about that. Talk about it at team meetings, at company rides, get-togethers, and really put it upfront about how important this is for the organization and to that leader

And then, for line managers to be talking about all the time. This isn't a secondary people issue. This is fundamental to the success of the organization. And so it's something that should be just talked about, just as your business targets and your objectives are

And then I guess just some organizations have, if you're a larger organization, have employee networks. So there's that kind of peer-to-peer support about what works well for you in terms of flexible working. And can they talk about what some of the challenges are and offering that support to one another

Nicola

Something that you alluded to there was that part time workers can sometimes feel like second-tier employees within an organization. And I just wondered if that's something that either of you have ever experienced personally.

Lucy

I think that I've never felt a second-tier employee because I've been part-time. But I definitely think that I maybe have held myself back from still going for probations and things like that, because I felt like, ""Can I fit that into four days?"" You know, there is a practical side to it. But also, that might be just me sort of holding myself back there, I mean. But there is the practical side of, ""Can I do that in four days? Can I achieve that?"" I mean, ultimately what I do, I squeeze five days into four days. That's a sort of different

Lisa

I think that again, what I was going to say is it often comes back to communication. So I think people do worry that, ""Oh, am I going to miss things? Or am I not even able to get my work done in the team?"" I think fundamentally, if you are working a part-time rather than full-time, your job has to be designed in such a way that it's not a full-time job, and you're not squeezing three days work into what was typically a five-day role. So it's really important actually for managers to look at the job design of that role, and make sure that it's feasible within the three or four days or whatever it is that that person is working

And also, what's really important is to look at, rather than hours worked or days, what are the objectives of that role? What are the outputs required by the organization? And keep checking in with your employee or your manager about how you're getting on with that, and being realistic about what's possible in that time

Nikki

Yeah, I would second that as well. I think there's so much emphasis focused on the hours that people work. When someone's designing a new job, the first thing we often think of is like, Monday to Friday, it's nine to five, and there's this real focus on hours. And it's just a bit changing, that we are thinking

So that's much more about, what is it you want this persons achieve? What are the outputs, what are the outcomes? What does good look like here? I mean, anyone in our small team, we don't really think about the hours. We all work flexibly. We all work part-time. We all work slightly different part-time hours. But it's actually about what's achievable. What is the objectives of each of us? And I think when you strip away that obsession with hours, you really do come back to what are the objectives? What are the objective of this role? And it's a much smarter way of running a business, I would say

Lisa

I think there's also something... I mean we hear a lot about managing customer or client in kind of relationships when part time wouldn't work, because we've got to be there 24/7. And of course, you do have to be responsive to your customers and your clients, or whoever, whatever you're serving. But it's also sometimes about managing those expectations

So some good examples we've heard from law firms recently is you know, a client coming and saying, ""I need this turned around by the very next morning,"" and actually very gently pushing back to talk about really what the team skills are, and is that really needed, and so on. And actually kind of pushing that back a little bit and managing expectations between the employee, the person managing that relationship, and the customer or the client. But also then, some really practical things that people can do is on their email signatures, you let people know very clearly the days and times that you're working, and when you're available

And also, many people who work part time have a bit of flexibility too. So it's not, when they're not in the office, they're absolutely shutting off. There could be the opportunity to take a phone call or respond to emails at certain times, but being clear about when you are available, so that you have certain boundaries in place too

Nicola

And in terms of the cultural aspects within the organization, do you have any tips for managers that are managing part-time staff, in how they could maybe make a part-time worker feel included and just help improve that team dynamics? Do you have any practical tips there

Lisa

It's being mindful, first of all, of when your whole team is together. So we're hearing lots of teams that they pick a day that their whole core team are together. It might be a Monday or Tuesday morning, or whatever. Whatever works for your team, and finding that day that you are coming together to set your objectives or talk about what's going on for the week. And then really nice practical things of Friday drinks might... you know, that kind of traditional ""let's go for a pint on a Friday"", however, that might not suit your whole team, because some people might not be in on a Friday. There other things that you could do to make people feel included

And likewise with training, and so on too. You know, when you're offering training to your teams, are you mindful of when all of your teams are in, so that everyone has the opportunity to take part? And that can have a professional development opportunity

Nicola

I think we're actually seeing this kind of play out at the moment, because we're recording this in the context of COVID-19 and the social distancing period. So we're all having to think outside the box about how we meet. We're all working in different locations, and everyone's got their own personal situations going on

So I found it really fascinating just to see how organizations are getting their team together. And I guess there's no reason why that can't continue when we are back in the office, and some people are full-time and others are part-time, and others work remote

So I hope that that continues after the situation.

Nikki

Lots of organizations are doing that so well. And those are the organizations that are probably transitioning to this period with more ease than others. And the organizations that may be slightly lacking, it hasn't really gotten some set up to manage remotely, are the ones that are possibly struggling a little bit more

I think it's really important to also see that this is not normal flexible working. This is not normal home working because it's almost overnight, whole teams or organizations have moved from their usual way of working to all working at home. And for a lot of people they're also at home with partners, with children, and when they're also popping in on elderly relatives and different things to deliver things. So, it's not kind of like your normal home working

But I'm with you in that maybe it actually will hit organizations to see there are different ways of keeping teams connected, and making better use of technology to do that, when we come out the other side of this

Nicola

Yeah, definitely. So in a recent report that I came across, and we can put the links in the show notes for this, it found that part-time workers outperform full-time workers. And I just wondered, could you explain what the reasons were for this

Lisa

Well, we work quite closely with a small company in Glasgow called Pursuit Marketing. And back in 2016, they were analyzing the productivity of their employees. And they can do that because of the nature of their business. It's kind of a digital marketing agency principally

And what they found when they were looking at this data, was that their part-time employees were working on the whole or were more productive than many or most of their full-time workers

So what they decided to do was trial a four-day working week for everybody on the same pace. So full-time paid, everyone were working four days, with the option to come in a Friday if they wanted to earn some extra kind of bonus income. And over the team, the following years after that, their productivity of their business is increased on an average of 29%

Nicola

Wow!

Lisa

So the four-day working week, I'm not saying that would work for every organization and every circumstance by a long way. But it's a really, really interesting example, and provide some data for maybe more informal anecdotal evidence that when you're working part-time, and you've got to finish by a certain deadline, you become more productive in certain things that you may have done maybe chatting to a colleague for a bit longer or nothing to do something. You just have to get your head down and work. So it's a really nice example of that. I'm from Glasgow. Yeah

Lucy

Yeah, I definitely agree. I think, partly, it's going part-time. So I went by my decision to become part time because I had kids. And I actually feel like it's giving me a much better work-life balance. And it's also made me, this might be partly because of becoming a parent as well, but it's made me much better at managing my time, and becoming much more organized actually, definitely. And sort of juggling lots of things, and just keep keeping tabs as well on sort of deadlines, making sure that I'm still on track. And maybe, that's because I'm taking a closer, I'm sort of more closer to... Because I'm working four days, I don't want to miss anything. So, I'm quite aware of that. But yeah

Lisa

Yeah. And I think that's surely typically seen. I think from my experience having my first baby, I felt exactly the same. I'd always worked full-time, and then I went down to three days a week. And I thought, ""Oh my, I have never been more productive."" And I've always worked too hard. Almost certain, I feel like I'm on some sort of turbo boost because I need to leave at a certain time, to go and pick up Alfie from a nursery at that time. So yeah, it was really interesting

Plus, I think when you're part time, you do feel grateful to have that flexibility, that it gives you that work life-balance that you talked about, Lucy. And it gives you that loyalty to the employer. I certainly feel that myself, personally. And so I would make myself available at home at certain times when Alfie was asleep or whatever, to take phone calls or take part in meetings because I was really grateful to have the opportunity for a better work-life balance

Lucy

That's exactly it. I think if you've got an employer that's willing to give you that flexibility to really invest in you, then you'll be happy to give more of yourself back as well. And certainly, yeah, it makes you loyal as well, like you said

Nicola

And what advice would you give someone who wanted to work part-time? What kind of things should they consider before approaching a manager and just asking if they could move to part-time hours? So I was thinking here about things like, expecting the same benefits as working full-time, considering financial position, and just kind of things for people to just consider before they make that jump to part-time

Nikki

I think the first thing is for them to think about how the job would actually look doing it part-time. And they're the best person to know because they're doing the job. So it's back to the point of view that there's no point trying to squash a full-time job into part-time, because then people just get really burnt out. So as for thinking about how from not going to do as many things, how else could that be cut off? And really think that through

And maybe the job couldn't be done just part-time, so is there a job-share opportunity here? Maybe it's a case of reducing your hours and bringing someone else in, to work the other part of the job. Or is there a development opportunity for somebody else in the team to take on some of the responsibilities

And then obviously, pay. Actually yeah, you need to think about what's the financial impact and all that

And I think, for anyone going and talking to their manager, it's about almost being on the front foot and thinking, ""Well, what are the likely objections that I'm going to hear from the manager?"" And having almost like a business plan, a business case prepared that you've thought of, you preempted on. ""I think you might ask me about this."" I've got an answer ready, I've thought about this. So I think it's just being really prepared for that conversation, and ready to serve pushback and some of the arguments that you think are likely to come forward from the manager

Lisa

And I think, just to add to that too, it's also about being flexible on the other side as well. Because you'll have thought through all these things and that's brilliant, but there also could be things that you've not thought about. If your manager comes to you and said, ""Okay, well you've talked about being off on a Friday, but that maybe doesn't work for our business objectives. Would you consider it being off on another day?"" So, it's also being flexible to alternative possibilities, and not having a completely fixed idea in your mind

Nicola

Yeah, that makes sense. Lucy, do you have anything to add there

Lucy

I think just probably that makes sure that it is really what you want, and that it is feasible obviously financially. Because I think, once you are made part-time, it may not be so easy to then increase back to full-time if it does sort of work out. So I think just making really sure that that's going to work for you

Lisa

I think another thing just to add to what Lucy said there, and I think that is a good point, is asking for a trial period for any change. It's always a good idea both for yourself, but also for your organization. It can give a bit of comfort too, that okay, if this really isn't working, then we can go back and look at it

But I would also encourage you to look at the Acast website in terms of the legalities behind making a flexible work into place. Because you can only put an affordable flexible work into place once in every 12-month period. But we could also be talking about informal flexible working request too. A lot of people work flexibly in a very informal basis. It's not in their contract or such. So there's lots of different ways of handling it.

Nicola

Thank you, Lisa. Yeah, we'll pop the link to that in the show notes as well. And Nikki, something you mentioned there is about job-sharing. So my understanding is that you and Lisa job-share your director role at Flexibility Works. Can you just give us some insight into how you do that practically on a day-to-day level? Do you share an inbox? Do you share to-do lists? How do you manage that

Nikki

Okay. I think there's so many different ways that job-sharing can work, and it very much depends on the role and the people who are doing. For us, I think we probably stay quite hands on and active role on most aspects of running the organization at high level. But then, we've each got our kind of ideas we specialize in, that we take responsibility for. Communication for us is absolutely key. We've found that just keeping each other up-to-date with everything, we each should be aware of that, even the practicalities of how to do that, using like WhatsApp chat, rather than everything having to be done by email. So it's just finding ways that work for you

Yeah. But it does look really, really different for the different kinds of roles that people are doing on a job-share basis. And it's worth just investing a little bit time, and really thinking through how do you work, how does your job-share partner work, how do you like to communicate, building on a wee bit of time for overlaps, so that there is that time in the week that you can just focus on being a job-share, making that work, handing over to one another. I think that's really important, that you factor in that time within the working week

Lisa

I mean, I think that covers a lot of it. I think communication is definitely the key. I think what's also important is, when you're working with teams, first, to support them. And I think we're sometimes not always the best at doing this yet, but making sure that everyone's clear about who's signing off for certain projects: is it Lisa or is it Nikki who we go to about this

And once that person said, that's it. Then, we can move forward. So giving your team the clarity about decision-making and so on, and who they should go to, and who is line managing as well, so that there's quite clear lines of support within your team, as well with a specific person

Nikki

One of the things I would say about job-share, just really personally for me, sometimes there's a real pushback. I think organizations think that they're actually employing two people. But for me personally, two minds are so much better than one. You know, we work at a pace that I've never really worked at before. Now, that's partly because I'm part-time. Also just having the other person to bounce things off of, something that would not be swirling around in your mind. You know, I've got somebody else. I've got a buddy that I can quickly go, ""What's your thing? I'm thinking this."" And it's checking in, and decisions can happen much quicker

I think it also makes you braver, because you're able to bounce things off of somebody else, and then make that decision quickly, and then just go forward it. So really honestly, I think organizations get so much from job-sharers

Nicola

Definitely.

Nikki

And it's actually really easy for a manager in a lot of ways, because although managers think that's managing two people, it actually takes a lot of the sting out of management. Because you guys just support one another, and make decisions in a way that they would not be normally have to be going to the manager to involve them in the conversation. So I really do think organizations get bang for their buck in terms of having job-sharers

Lisa

I would say, I think some organizations could be a bit hesitant about it. Not only because of the budget, because quite often people will work three days each, so there's almost an extra day in there, but the value for money that you get for that, I would say second to none. And my husband jokes, ""It's like a second manager."" This partnership with Nikki. Which is I get from a business perspective

But I think the connection between those two people has to be right. So we hear a lot of employers say, ""Oh, but how do we get those two individuals to work well together?"" That is absolutely key. And I think that's right, and two people have to have that very good working relationships to make that work. So, that's fundamental to the success of that, I would say

Nicola

Yeah, I was just going to say that. Just can imagine it's based on a great working relationship between the two people already. It would be more difficult just to bring two random people who wanted to job-share that role. It is dependent on that good relationship existing already. But I totally agree with you. I only see it as a good thing. And just like you said, they're getting value for money, and bringing two experts to the same role, and just being able to bounce off ideas. Sounds great

Nikki

It's also business continuity. And a couple of years ago, I met two women who were working in a job-share. And it was quite new at the time. And then what happened after about six months into this, one of them two was quite seriously ill. And was then all longterm sick. So the other one was... It was almost business as usual because the other person was still there. They were able to pick up. They knew what was happening, they knew the team, they knew the projects. And that organization was able to continue functioning quite well because they had that other job-share person still

Of course, if they hadn't had a job-share, it would have been much more critical situation because there wouldn't have been somebody there who understood the projects, and the clients, and the team just as well. So that was a real blessing in terms of business continuity that that role was actually a job-share

Lisa

And I think also it helps contribute to closing the gender pay gap. I mean, we're talking about part time, but potentially, job-share lends itself really well to senior positions. Because sometimes, the argument will be a role just is too big for anything less than full time. And certainly, job-share has been one solution to that. And I think through the team ways, the power list of people who are working part-time and job-share, it shows particularly within a senior role. Job-share is a very good solution to that

Nicola

Yeah, absolutely. Because at first, I thought it would be more difficult in a senior role to job-share. But it does make sense for the business continuity reasons that you've outlined. Lucy, do you have anything to add there

Lucy

No. I mean, I don't job-share. I know a lot of people that do, and it's worked for them. And I think it's a great way to, like you say, like a different way perhaps that a business could take. Rather than putting someone in part-time, it could be a job-share. And I think that's an excellent solution to fulfilling a role. Yeah

Nicola

I think it's especially interesting at this time as well. And just with COVID-19, and just something that organizations could perhaps think about or look, like you say, for the business continuity reasons as well. It's especially relevant just now

Does anyone want to mention anything that we haven't discussed already just in regards to part-time work?

Lisa

I guess what would be nice to mention in regards to part-time work is the lack of flexible and part-time working that's advertised for people. So in Scotland, for example, just slightly less than 12% of jobs advertised that mentioned flexible working which includes part-time. But we know in Scotland that three quarters of people would like to work flexibly

So there's a real disconnect there between people who either are working flexibly or would like to work flexibly. And then if they're looking to move jobs, the absolute lack of part-time or flexible working opportunities out there, particularly kind of quality jobs. And we're talking about quality jobs, we're talking about aim salaries of �20,000 or above

So what we would really encourage employers to do is, at that point of hiring, somebody is to really look at the role and to question, ""Does it need to be full-time?"" That the opportunity to mention somewhere that this role is open to flexible working. Because the benefits of doing that are enormous

Zurich Insurance, for example, we spoke to them recently, and they put a sentence on their job adverts. They were looking to recruit more senior women. And they said, we're open to talk about flexible working. And over the three-month recruitment period, they had an increase of 45% from women applying for senior roles. So for them, that was a major win in terms of their gender pay gap and better diversity within their business

So definitely, we would encourage people to recruit flexibly whenever possible, which we believe is most of the time

Lucy

Yeah, it's really interesting because people could be missing out actually on this massive pool of talent, just because they're so determined this has to be a full-time role and you need to be in five days a week. But actually, you're right. They don't need to be. As long as they're meeting their objectives, and they've got the talent and the skills, why not give somebody an opportunity there

Nicola

I think you say, Lisa, that so many people, potentially lots of women, wouldn't even bother applying or showing any interest to a role if they don't see that sentence there. So yeah, hopefully more organizations will include that sentence or at least AB test it in their job adverts just to see what the difference is

We'll now move on to our regular feature, what I learned this week. Where we each share something we've picked up on over the last seven days. Lucy, would you like to go first

Lucy

Well, the moment I was sort of learning, it's like a new app every day at the moment, because we're obviously in the midst of this COVID-19. So, I've been sort of looking at using a variety of video conferencing apps, and things like that. So I've tried Houseparty. Obviously, we're using Zoom right now, and Microsoft Teams, WhatsApp. I'd never knew that half these things existed until about a couple of weeks ago. So yeah, it's a new app every day at the moment

Nicola

It is a whole new world out there. Thank you for that. And Nikki, would you like to go next

Nikki

Well, I like to say it's something quite similar to Lucy. And so, it's about the different tastes of technology. But it's also for me, what amazing things technology has been used for the moment. So we went to the Safari Park last week, and we saw the Giraffes. And we are doing exercises on live streaming. And we are doing bedtime stories with some amazing Julia Donaldson. These are our bedtime stories the other night. And it's just highly impressive. And not just businesses are being around technology, but just in life in general, all the great ways. And I know they're so much as not the same as going into museum, but actually just how innovative people are being with their use of technology has really astounded me and blown me away over the last week. It's like every day I'm in a different place doing a different thing, thanks to technology

Nicola

Yeah, absolutely. I saw that the Vatican are doing tours of their museums and things like that. And I showed my granny, she would usually go to church every week. And she was just loving it, and loving being able to join different church services throughout the world. And yeah, it's great

Lisa, what did you learn this week

Lisa

Well, mine's a bit more philosophical, I guess. For me, it's being where there's a will, there's a way. Our day job is talking to employers about flexible working, and we hear a lot of all the student referrals, or people can work from home, or working part-time just isn't feasible

And then in the last couple of weeks, we've spoken to a lot of employers who have just said, we've been sitting with Microsoft Teams for two years and we've not used it. And all of a sudden, everyone's using it. And it's amazing. We're not seeing real experts, but by my goodness, everyone's out there and accessing it, because we've been forced into that situation

So, where there's a will, there's a way. I guess we just encourage everyone to be thinking. I mean, there's lots of really critical and business critical decisions to be making right now, but once the dust settles, maybe to start thinking about the small positives that we can take from all of this. And I think working culture and how we can work flexibly and remotely is definitely one for all of us

Nicola

Yeah, absolutely

My what I learned this week is actually relevant to both Nikki's and Lucy's. And it's in terms of being able to watch different chefs cook different meals, called Kitchen Quarantine. And I've just enjoyed making the most of what's in your cupboard and just thinking a bit more creatively. So I would just suggest if you look up on Instagram or any other social platform, Kitchen Quarantine, it's amazing what you can make out of some butter beans. I made a chocolate cake. So, there you go

Nikki

That's a good tip.

Nicola

Yeah.

And that's all from us this week. If you'd like to get in touch with us about anything we've said on the show, you can tweet me at Nicole_BoyleEW. You can get in touch with Lucy... Do you want to say Twitter, or LinkedIn, or

Lucy

Yeah, how about LinkedIn? Yep

Nicola

So if you just search for Lucy Bishop on LinkedIn.

And the best way to get in touch with Lisa is-

Lisa

Through our Flexibility Works website.

Nicola

Great. Thank you. We'll put definitely proper link in the show notes for that.

And the best way to get in touch with Nikki is also searching Flexibility Works. You can find out more about Emerald Works at EmeraldWorks.com, and tweet us at Emerald_Works

Lisa, do you want to say anything about Flexibility Works here

Lisa

Flexibility Works has just launched on the 14th of April, and we are here to support employers across Scotland to have a more flexible working culture that benefits their organization, their business, and also their people. You can find out more information about what we do and the support we can offer on our website. And we've also got many resources for employers. They are free of charge. You can access right now, particularly around the COVID-19 situation

Nicola

Great. Thank you.

And if you've enjoyed the show, please leave us a review. And make sure you subscribe so you never miss an episode. Thanks for listening. Bye for now

Nikki Slowey

Nikki Slowey

Co Founder, Flexibility Works

Flexibility Works is a social business, co-founded by two of Scotland’s leading experts in Flexible Working – Lisa Gallagher and Nikki Slowey.

Flexibility Works is now harnessing all of our energy, knowledge and passion to support more employers than ever before to move their dial on flexible working. Our approach is human, professional and practical.
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Lisa Gallagher

Lisa Gallagher

Co Founder, Flexibility Works

As a social organisation, part of our mission is to add value for employers free of charge, supporting lower income workers to secure the flexibility they need to balance their work and home life.

Working flexibly is not only good for employers and people, it has the power to address deep-rooted, societal and economic issues like poverty, inequality, and the health and wellbeing of our nation.

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Nicola Boyle

Nicola Boyle

Marketing Communications Executive, Emerald Works

Nicola has over six years of marketing experience. Her responsibilities include managing social media, podcast and webinar channels, as well content management and event planning. Nicola enjoys identifying and anticipating client needs and delivering the best possible experience to build successful long-standing client relationships.
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Lucy Bishop

Lucy Bishop

Content Editor, Emerald Works

Lucy has over 12 years of editorial experience. She manages video production and edits various tools and resources for Emerald Works, including BSTs, articles and blogs.
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About the author

Nicola Boyle

Nicola Boyle

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